Ariana Grande's sexuality may be under the spotlight in 'Monopoly', but she shares so much more in her new single

'I like women and men (yeah)' sings Ariana Grande in her new song 'Monopoly'. Does that mean what it means or is she talking more about friendships and heartbreaks?


                            Ariana Grande's sexuality may be under the spotlight in 'Monopoly', but she shares so much more in her new single

Ariana Grande's new song 'Monopoly' is out and we couldn't be more psyched, but are the lyrics her coming out story as rumors claim or is there something more intimate to it?

This time, Grande is again in the spotlight not just for her groovy song. No sooner did the teaser for her new collaboration with Victoria Monet in 'Monopoly' came out, people already assumed that the lyrics are a coming out story of Grande being bisexual.

Is that true? To be frank, we do not know yet, and Grande clearly stated in her Twitter handle that she doesn't want to be labeled.



 

While fans are always on the lookout for what celebrities do in their personal lives — Instagram and Twitter allow audiences to break open the peepholes and make a quantitative assumption based on shares and retweets. Though we love to pick up on these tender emotional moments, we often tend to miss out on the little hints that speaks much more about a celebrity’s life, their struggle, individuality, trivialities, etc.

The song which has become a sensation due to its explicit lyrics gives a hard glimpse about Grande's life as well, but all of that was overshadowed by that one line which says: "I like women and men (yeah)".

The rumors were hardbound by the simple fact that Monet, her collaborator, is herself bisexual. The hoopla also managed to obliterate the simple pleasures that Monet and Grande enjoy by playing Monopoly during their free time — the game from which the song derives its name. Maybe such trivial engagements also allow her to shrug off the bad vibes in her life. "Bad vibes, get off of me / Outta here with that f*ckery"

Apart from picking up stuff from her daily life, she also talks about her struggles in her own words: "I like women and men (Yeah) / Work so f*ckin' much, need a twinny, twin, twin (Hey) / You'd be straight for life if I gave you my PIN (Yeah) / Even though we gave up that 90% for the win, go."

Before 'Monopoly', Grande and Victoria's song '7 rings', (again a huge hit) lost 90% of the royalties to the music company Concord as '7 rings' borrowed a sampling from 'The Sound of Music' — "These are a few of my favorite things" — written originally by Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein. Although Grande says this with no regret, she is also not shy to reveal about the hard work that she had put up in her work and album.

Apart from picking up stuff from her daily life, she also talks about her struggles in her own words in 'Monopoly' (Getty Images)
Apart from picking up stuff from her daily life, she also talks about her struggles in her own words in 'Monopoly' (Getty Images)

Grande also lets her fans know how she was able to make her album 'Thank U, Next' which she immensely enjoyed and was drunk on Clicquot, during most of the time, as she sings: "Remember when we made a f*ckin' album off that Clicquot? (Ooh)"

By the third stanza, Grande has given her fans enough eye-candy into her personal life and yet what stuck with the larger audience was the one line which could also simply mean, loving all humanity — men and women alike. The video not only epitomizes the friendship that Grande shares with Monet but the lyrics also appreciate another guide and friend of hers' — Eric Vetro, a vocal coach in LA who has worked with Grande before.

Although the world has gone gaga over the lyrical representation of her sexuality,  is it right to allow one line to steal the show, and become the microcosm of her identity? Grande has repeatedly said how this song has more to do with being thankful for her life and her friends, through her various tweets and we should also be thankful for her creative contributions.