Apple Fire burns 4,125 acres in California's Cherry Valley triggering evacuations, why is the blaze named so?

Although firefighters from across Southern California are out working hard to contain the fire burning in Riverside County, there has been zero containment


                            Apple Fire burns 4,125 acres in California's Cherry Valley triggering evacuations, why is the blaze named so?
(Getty Images)

Apple Fire in California's Cherry Valley has burnt down almost 4,125 acres by Saturday afternoon. Although firefighters from across Southern California are out working hard to contain the fire burning in Riverside County, there has been zero containment. Eventually, evacuation orders and warnings were carried out.

Firefighters from Santa Maria and Lompoc were also called in to help fight the spread. It was reported that at least 1,000 homes were evacuated and moved to safety as a result of the fire. According to reports, at least one home and two buildings were destroyed by the deadly blaze. 

Roughly an hour ago, the San Bernardino County Sheriff's office tweeted instructions for the evacuations. "#AppleFire OAKGLEN AREA: You are now subject to a voluntary evacuation order. Use Oak Glen Rd or Potato Canyon to evacuate the area. FOREST FALLS AREA: You are now subject to a voluntary evacuation order. Use hwy 38 to evacuate the area."



 

It was shortly after 5 pm on Friday that reports started coming in about the fire, which started as two adjacent fires in Cherry Valley, an unincorporated area near the city of Beaumont, in Riverside County. The cause of the fire is being investigated and remains under a pressing matter. 

While efforts to get the blaze under control are ongoing, many people are a tad bit confused about why it is named 'Apple Fire'. "Why is this called an #AppleFire? Real question," a Twitter user sent a query on the social media site. 



 

Another user said, "Fires are often named after roads they start near:"Two possible arson fires were reported at 5 p.m Friday in the area of Apple Tree Lane and Oak Glen Road, on the north end of the unincorporated community bordering Beaumont and merged into one by 5:45 p.m., Cal Fire said Friday."



 

A New York Times article from two years ago addressed said wildfires are named after their place of origin because unlike hurricanes, fires are not named from a predetermined list. The California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection said that official names are based on "a geographical location, local landmark, street, lake, mountain, peak, etc."

The task usually falls on the first fire personnel on the scene. "You could have a fire by a landfill - and they might call it the Dump Fire," Heather Williams, a Cal Fire spokeswoman said. "Sometimes the names come through and it's like, 'Really guys?'"

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