Coronavirus outbreak spurs ammo sales as people fear lawlessness and chaos: 'They want to keep themselves safe'

American ammo retailer Ammo.com has revealed that people are not only buying the garden variety protective stuff, they're also stocking up on things that can kill


                            Coronavirus outbreak spurs ammo sales as people fear lawlessness and chaos: 'They want to keep themselves safe'
(Getty Images)

It looks like not only has the new coronavirus made sanitizers, masks, and flu medicines fly off the shelves, it has also aided in the sales of ammunition. American ammo retailer Ammo.com has revealed that people are not only buying the garden variety stuff, they're also stocking up on things that can kill. 

The company, according to reports, has seen a significant increase in sales since February 23, 2020. The increase matches the time frame of panic and public concern from COVID 19.

According to a statement from the company, data shows that there was a 68 percent increase in the company's transactions between February 23 to March 4 when compared to the 11 days before February 23 (February 12 to 22).

Alex Horsman, the marketing manager at Ammo.com, said, "We know certain things impact ammo sales, mostly political events or economic instability when people feel their rights may end up infringed, but this is our first experience with a virus leading to such a boost in sales."

Horsman continued, "But it makes sense. A lot of our customers like to be prepared. And for many of them, it's not just facemasks and TheraFlu. It's knowing that no matter what happens, they can keep themselves and their families safe."

According to reports, .40 caliber handgun ammunition sales saw a spike of 410 percent while AR-15 ammunition sales increased by 194 percent. The company also reported a 101 percent increase in 9mm ammo sales and a 95 percent increase in the sale of 12 gauge shells.

However, Ammo.com isn't the only one talking about this surge in interest. The Washington Examiner had also reported a similar trend where "preppers"  were stocking up on handguns and rifles in case of a pandemic.

Justin Anderson, marketing director for Hyatt Guns in Charlotte, North Carolina, one of the big wigs in the industry told the paper, "I've seen a notable spike in the purchase of bulk ammo, which is usually a barometer of people's fear in these types of situations," he said, adding, “The person with the most ammo wins."

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