Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez wanted a week off for 'self-care' before taking office next month

The youngest person ever elected in Congress, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez says that, for working people, immigrants, & the poor, 'self-care is political'


                            Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez wanted a week off for 'self-care' before taking office next month

The New York congresswoman-elect, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, on Monday announced that she is taking a week's time off for "self-care" before starting her new position in January, according to reports. Ocasio-Cortez, a Democratic Socialist, made the announcement through a video on Instagram, saying she will be taking some time off in an attempt to prevent feeling burnt out even before she takes office next month. 

"I am starting a week of self-care where I am taking the week off and taking care of me. I don't know how to do that though, so I would appreciate any and all self-care tips," the youngest person ever elected in Congress said.

The 29-year-old, in the video, revealed that she drove to "the middle of nowhere" in upstate New York with books, lavender oil and music and later posted about her self-care decision on Twitter politicizing it.

New York Democratic congressional candidate Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez speaks at a rally calling on Sen. Jeff Flake (R-AZ) to reject Judge Brett Kavanaugh's nomination to the Supreme Court on October 1, 2018 in Boston, Massachusetts. Sen. Flake is scheduled to give a talk at the Forbes 30 under 30 event in Boston after recently calling for a one week pause in the confirmation process to give the FBI more time to investigate sexual assault allegations.
New York Democratic congressional candidate Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez speaks at a rally calling on Sen. Jeff Flake (R-AZ) to reject Judge Brett Kavanaugh's nomination to the Supreme Court on October 1, 2018 in Boston, Massachusetts. Sen. Flake is scheduled to give a talk at the Forbes 30 under 30 event in Boston after recently calling for a one week pause in the confirmation process to give the FBI more time to investigate sexual assault allegations.

She wrote on Twitter: "For working people, immigrants, & the poor, self-care is political — not because we want it to be, but [because] of the inevitable shaming of someone doing a face mask while financially stressed."

The congresswoman-elect said that one of the main reasons for her decision to take some time off was because she neglected herself while campaigning for her position and that it has taken a toll on her health.

"Before the campaign, I used to practice yoga 3-4x/week, eat nutritiously, read and write for leisure," she wrote on Instagram. "As soon as everything kicked up, that all went out the window. I went from doing yoga and making wild rice and salmon dinners to eating fast food for dinner and falling asleep in my jeans and makeup."

Ocasio-Cortez, ever since she unseated longtime Democratic Rep Joe Crowley in the New York primary earlier this year, has strongly spoken about her fight toward socialism. The 29-year-old also made news when she recently promised her interns a "living wage" as she actively hit back at her critics who mocked her appearance and age. Prominent Republicans, including senator Lindsey Graham, Donald Trump Jr and Kelleyanne Conway, recently questioned her political knowledge citing her age. 

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez hugs a supporter during her victory celebration at La Boom night club in Queens on November 6, 2018 in New York City. With her win against Republican Anthony Pappas, Ocasio-Cortez became the youngest woman elected to Congress.
Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez hugs a supporter during her victory celebration at La Boom night club in Queens on November 6, 2018 in New York City. With her win against Republican Anthony Pappas, Ocasio-Cortez became the youngest woman elected to Congress.

Ocasio-Cortez said that she is taking a temporary break from fighting her critics and will be spending a few days with "lots of books to choose from, epsom salt, lavender oil, notebooks, pens, music etc...' She added on her Instagram story that "self-care is important for activists. Without it we WILL burn out and walk away."

"I keep things raw and honest on here since I believe public servants do a disservice to our communities by pretending to be perfect. It makes things harder for others who aspire to run someday if they think they have to be superhuman before they even try," she added in the video.