Vermont's pro-choice Republican governor may allow abortion rights bill to become law

The bill proposes to recognize the freedom of reproductive choice as a fundamental right which would mean that women would get the right to make their own decisions with respect to either terminating their pregnancy or to have the baby


                            Vermont's pro-choice Republican governor may allow abortion rights bill to become law

Vermont Governor Phil Scott is set to allow a comprehensive abortion act that preserves the right to abortion to become law.

The upsurge of restrictive abortion laws including the one passed recently in Alabama may have been a cause of concern among pro-choice citizens but a recent bill in Vermont may give them a reason to hope. In Vermont, as reported by CNN, the Bill H.57 has passed both the House and the Senate and would become a law if the Governor approves it or chooses not to act against it. This act relates to preserving the right to abortion and is being considered a comprehensive law in that regard.

The bill proposes to recognize the freedom of reproductive choice as a fundamental right which would mean that women would get the right to make their own decisions with respect to either terminating their pregnancy or to have the baby without being coerced into either decision by the state. This comes on the heels of the Alabama bill which has been widely criticized for being highly restrictive and regressive.

Further, the bill also seeks to protect the "rights to choose or refuse contraception or sterilization or to choose to carry a pregnancy to term, to give birth to a child, or to obtain an abortion."

This would mean that the woman would have more choices at each stage of her pregnancy and would be able to decide for herself.

After being passed by the two houses, the bill needs to be signed by Governor Phil Scott to become a law. The Governor is believed to be pro-choice and it has been reported that he would not veto the bill.

What this means is that, even if he does not act on it, the bill would become a law at the end of a five day period. It is also important to note that Vermont currently does not restrict abortion and both the houses, in fact, are controlled by Democrats.

A recent bill which was passed in Nevada also acts along similar lines when it comes to abortion. The Nevada bill provides that the physician would have to explain the procedure, post-operation care, and the risks associated with abortion and would not be required to tell women about the 'emotional implications' of an abortion.

These two laws stand in stark contrast with the laws passed in Alabama and other states which prohibit abortion even in case of rape or incest.