With 2 gay and 3 bisexual contestants, season 17 is American Idol’s most diverse installment

Fans revealed they are enjoying the diversity the series has started to offer this season with two gay contestants and three bisexual contestants on the show


                            With 2 gay and 3 bisexual contestants, season 17 is American Idol’s most diverse installment

Ever since its debut 17 years ago in 2002, the reality TV competition series, 'American Idol', has showcased just a few LGBTQ contestants. Until last season, most contestants chose to reveal their sexual orientation publicly after their journey in Idol ended. 

The first time the Idol fans experienced an LGBTQ- friendly season was season 13 when MK Nobilette revealed she was a lesbian during her segment on the competition. Following that, in season 16 there were two more singers who were out, loud and proud on TV. Beating all records, this season (17) there are more openly out LGBTQ contestants. 

We have Jeremiah Lloyd Harmon and Ryan Hammond, two openly gay contestants and three openly bisexual contestants — Bumbly, Dimitrius Graham and Uché Ndubizu. Though 'American Idol' might be on thin ice right now due to its comparatively poor TV ratings, that does not mean they are going to let anything stop it from being a memorable season, not just for the contestants but for the judges and fans as well. 



 

With two gay contestants and three bisexual contestants on the show, fans revealed they are enjoying the diversity the series has started to offer this season. "Building on from last season having two openly gay contestants, this season has two openly gay contestants in Jeremiah & Ryan and three openly bisexual contestants in [Bumbly], Dimitrius & Uché. Unless there are even more that we're not aware of, 25% of this cast is openly LGBT. I thought it was kind of awesome since earlier seasons of the show notably tried to keep the sexuality of the LGBT contestants under wraps," wrote a fan on Reddit.  

While another added, "Makes me think of how during Adam Lambert’s season pictures surfaced of him kissing another guy and news outlets went crazy. Probably why he came in second. I’m enjoying the diversity." 



 

Taking a look back at the previous seasons when the show first premiered, fans are happy the series has taken a turn toward the good. "Think about how, in Season 2, it was speculated that Vanessa Olivarez came out to another contestant and they gave her a scripted joke that got her eliminated. Her performance of 'You Keep Me Hangin’ On' was not great, but it should have been enough to get her through, but the scripted comment 'Ryan, I’m a singer, not a performing monkey like you' got her eliminated. She had also won her semifinals week, but that did not save her. Glad to see how far we have come," a fan said. 



 

Apart from featuring LGBTQ contestants, 'American Idol' compared to other reality TV competition series, makes contestants feel even more welcome by making them feel included, and by encouraging them to celebrate their diversity instead of trying to make them feel like they are sealed up. 

'American Idol' airs every Sunday and Monday on ABC. Check your local listings for more information.