White House threatens to rescind CNN reporter Acosta's press credentials again, claims TV network

CNN filed a lawsuit against Trump and several top aides at The White House after they revoked Acosta's press access, known as a Secret Service 'hard pass', to The White House


                            White House threatens to rescind CNN reporter Acosta's press credentials again, claims TV network

Days after a federal judge ordered the Trump administration to temporarily reinstate CNN correspondent Jim Acosta's press access, The White House is reportedly threatening to rescind the reporter's credentials again, according to the television network

CNN senior media correspondent Brian Stelter on Sunday said: "Friday's court ruling means that a temporary restraining order is in effect for 14 days. But [White House] officials sent Acosta a letter stating that his press pass is set to be suspended again once the restraining order expires."

CNN, in response to The White House threat, issued a statement stating that if the Trump administration acts on the threat, it would threaten "all journalists and news organizations".

"The White House is continuing to violate the First and Fifth Amendments of the Constitution. These actions threaten all journalists and news organizations. Jim Acosta and CNN will continue to report the news about the White House and the President," the television network said.



 

CNN filed a lawsuit against President Trump and several of his top aides at The White House after they revoked Acosta's press access, known as a Secret Service 'hard pass' to The White House. The suit, filed by the television network in a U.S. District Court in Washington, D.C, on Tuesday morning, reportedly alleged Acosta and CNN's First and Fifth Amendment rights were violated because of the ban imposed on them.

The White House banned Acosta last week after a heated exchange with the President during a press conference. The White House later released a video — which is believed to be altered — to show Acosta make physical contact with an intern, citing it as a reason for the ban. Trump, however, denied that claim and stated the video was not doctored and was simply a "close-up" of the incident.

U.S. President Donald Trump answers a question from Jim Acosta of CNN after giving remarks a day after the midterm elections on November 7, 2018, in the East Room of the White House in Washington, DC. (Getty Images)
U.S. President Donald Trump answers a question from Jim Acosta of CNN after giving remarks a day after the midterm elections on November 7, 2018, in the East Room of the White House in Washington, DC. (Getty Images)

However, a frame-by-frame comparison of the video posted by White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders and the one taken by the Associated Press, showed that the video tweeted by Sanders appeared to speed up Acosta's arm movement when he makes contact with a young intern trying to take away his microphone during last Wednesday's press conference. The sped-up footage made the gesture look threatening.

Shortly after U.S. District Judge Timothy Kelly granted CNN's request to temporarily restore Acosta's hard press pass, White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders released a statement announcing that The White House will restore Acosta's pass "temporarily", suggesting a possible revocation.

"Today, the court made clear that there is no absolute First Amendment right to access The White House," Sanders said. "In response to the court, we will temporarily reinstate the reporter’s hard pass. We will also further develop rules and processes to ensure fair and orderly press conferences in the future."