US officials seek extradition of Saudi student, 21, in connection with the murder of Oregon girl

Abdulrahman Semeer Noorah, studying at the Portland Community College, went missing nearly two weeks before he was due to stand trial in 2017 for a 2016 fatal hit and run case


                            US officials seek extradition of Saudi student, 21, in connection with the murder of Oregon girl

US officials are trying to get a 21-year-old murder accused from Saudi Arabia back in the country after he reportedly fled on an illicit passport on board a private jet.

Officials believe Abdulrahman Semeer Noorah, studying at the Portland Community College, fled the country in 2017 with the assistance of Saudi Arabia's consulate.

Noorah has been accused of killing 15-year-old Fallon Smart in a fatal hit-and-run at Hawthorne Boulevard in Portland, Oregon in August 2016.

He went missing on June 10, 2017, nearly two weeks before he was due to stand trial. Saudi government, this July, confirmed to the US Marshals that Noorah had returned to Saudi Arabia seven days after he was reported missing.



 

The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) does not have any extradition agreement with the US. A supervisory deputy US Marshal in Oregon, Eric Wahlstrom, while talking to Oregon Live, said: "We're doing everything we can to get him back."

Reports state that Noorah skipped bail in Portland, Oregon after the Saudi consulate posted $100,000 bond in 2016. The Saudi citizen reportedly packed a bag and was picked up by a private black GMC Yukon XL car, which took him two miles to a sand-and-gravel yard. The 21-year-old then reportedly cut off the tracking device placed on his ankle before boarding the plane.

Although the Saudi consulate posted a generous bond for Noorah, US officials believe that his parents back home are not influential. Deputy Kari Kolberg said that his mother is a kindergarten teacher while his father owns a trailer business.



 

Saudi Arabia, reportedly, often posts bail for its citizens who are arrested in the United States. The consulate had posted a $2 million bail for a Saudi student in 2013, who was accused of murdering a bar owner in Missouri. The consulate had also posted $5 million bail for a Saudi princess accused of human trafficking, the Daily Mail reported.

Noorah's bail had been raised from $280,000 to $1 million because he was considered a flight risk, however, that did not stop him from evading the law as the consulate paid the generous bond amount of $100,000 (10 per cent needed in the state to be released).