'Get rid of my kids': Trump allegedly told John Kelly to force Ivanka and Kushner to resign because they were bringing him too much bad press

According to a new book about the Kushner family, Trump told Kelly: 'Get rid of my kids; get them back to New York.'


                            'Get rid of my kids': Trump allegedly told John Kelly to force Ivanka and Kushner to resign because they were bringing him too much bad press

President Donald Trump reportedly told his incoming White House chief of staff John Kelly in 2017 that he wanted his daughter Ivanka and son-in-law Jared Kushner away from Washington because they were bringing him too much bad press.

According to a new book about the Kushner family, Trump told Kelly: "Get rid of my kids; get them back to New  York." Ivanka and Jared reportedly supported appointing Kelly in the White House to whip the West Wing back into shape, months after former Republican Party boss Reince Priebus resigned from the top position in the White House.

U.S. President Donald Trump talks with White House Senior Advisor to the President Jared Kushner as they attend a Hanukkah Reception in the East Room of the White House, December 7, 2017, in Washington, DC. (Getty Images)
U.S. President Donald Trump talks with White House Senior Advisor to the President Jared Kushner as they attend a Hanukkah Reception in the East Room of the White House, December 7, 2017, in Washington, DC. (Getty Images)

 

However, according to the book 'Kushner Inc.', written by HuffPost editor-at-large Vicky Ward, Trump and Priebus turned on them, agreeing that they would find a way to force them to resign.

Ward, in her book, stated that Trump complained about his children not knowing "how to play the game" and created consistent headaches for the White House with negative media, a sneak-peek of the book by the New York Times revealed on Tuesday.



 

 

However, Ivanka and Jared outlasted Kelly and their influence over Trump and his decisions has become increasingly firm. President Trump reportedly put a $100 million line in this week's 2020 congressional budget request for a global women's fund, which is set to be spearheaded by his daughter.

The author of the book, on Monday night, wrote that she compiled the book "in part to pierce the narrative that Ivanka Trump and Jared Kushner have been moderating influences on the president. They are far from stabilizing forces. They are, in fact, his chief enablers."

President Donald Trump shakes the hand of his daughter and advisor, Ivanka Trump during a meeting with the American Workforce Policy Advisory Board inside the State Dining Room of the White House on March 6, 2019, in Washington, DC. (Getty Images)
President Donald Trump shakes the hand of his daughter and advisor, Ivanka Trump during a meeting with the American Workforce Policy Advisory Board inside the State Dining Room of the White House on March 6, 2019, in Washington, DC. (Getty Images)

Ward's book, however, was slammed by Kushner's camp as the spokesperson for his attorney Abbe Lowell, Peter Mirijanian, told the Times that "every point that Ms. Ward mentioned in what she called her 'fact-checking' stage was entirely false."



 

 

"It seems she has written a book of fiction rather than any serious attempt to get the facts. Correcting everything wrong would take too long and be pointless," Mirijanian said.

Shortly after Mirijanian's statement, Ward fired back saying that the "220 people" that she interviewed for the book might not agree with the spokesperson's statements.