US government officials under scrutiny for accessing revenge porn at work

US government officials under scrutiny for accessing revenge porn at work

Reports state that Anon-IB was accessed by multiple computers in the federal offices, sparking speculations that the government officials and employees could be looking at the adult content during working hours.

The United States government office computers, including the Senate, the US Navy and the Execute Office of the President have been linked to 'revenge porn' website Anon-IB. The notorious site is a message board where users generally upload explicit non-consensual sexual images and content.

Reports state that Anon-IB was accessed by multiple computers in the federal offices, sparking speculations that the government officials and employees could be looking at the adult content during working hours, according to a report by The Daily Beast.

Anon-IB, in 2014, was involved with a breach after nude pictures of celebrities were circulated across the internet that particular year, including that of Kristen Stewart, Jennifer Lawrence and Miley Cyrus. The website allows any user to share explicit images on its platform, reports state.

The sun shines on the U.S. House of Representatives early in the morning October 29, 2015 in Washington, DC. (Getty Images)

The website is reportedly divided into separate sections, where users can post explicit pictures according to different categories, which also includes the location from where the photo is uploaded.

Reports state that a user from a computer connected to a server at the US Senate, in November, had written on the site: "Wow tig ol bitties. You have any nudes to share?"

Users on the website reportedly often call nude pictures wins in the website's slang, according to the Daily Mail.

Pedestrians walk by one of the few remaining adult DVD stores in Times Square on August 7, 2017 in New York City. (Getty Images)

"Looking for wins of [redacted]. She used to send nudes to my friend all of the time. Would love to see some more," another anonymous user at the Senate wrote on the site.

It is difficult to find out who is posting what content or who is writing the comments on the site because of its anonymous nature. This feature makes it hard for law enforcement officials to zero-in on the perpetrators posting non-consensual content.

Members of the House of Representatives leave for Christmas break after passing a stopgap measure that will avoid a government shutdown. (Getty Images)

However, the Daily Beast, with the assistance of Norwegian security analyst Einar Otto Stangvik, managed to figure out the IP addresses which were linked to the posts on the particular adult website, reports say.

"The data we're currently working with was obtained and analyzed to better understand who spreads the abusive imagery, and to show that abusers should have no greater hopes of invisibility than their victims," Stangvik said.

Pedestrians walk by one of the few remaining adult DVD stores in Times Square on August 7, 2017 in New York City. (Getty Images)

Even though the US government offices were zeroed in during the IP addresses search, it is almost impossible to decipher which employees were accessing the website, as anyone can log in the computers using the guest user option, or the computers could also be hacked to access the site.

 

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