Piers Morgan calls Beto O'Rourke "the white version of Obama," slams his "uniquely depressive" campaign message

Morgan said O'Rourke's message was not not even a patch on Donald Trump's winning "Make America Great Again" campaign


                            Piers Morgan calls Beto O'Rourke "the white version of Obama," slams his "uniquely depressive" campaign message

British journalist Piers Morgan slammed Beto O'Rourke on Thursday after the Texan announced his Democratic Party candidacy for the 2020 presidential polls, calling him a "deluded loser."

Citing O'Rourke's 2018 Texas Senate loss to Ted Cruz, Morgan said that he lost the polls during the midterm elections and that even though he lost by a small margin "he still lost."

"And in the brutal world of US politics that usually means the last anyone hears from you for the rest of your natural life," the 'Good Morning Britain' host said.

The Good Morning Britain host, in an article on the Daily Mail, said that although the Texan announced his candidacy despite his loss, he did so "in rather unconventional fashion – by announcing the end of the world is fast upon us. As US presidential campaign messages go, it at least had the benefit of being uniquely depressing."

U.S. Senate candidate Rep. Beto O'Rourke (D-TX) pumps his fist for a cheering crowd before departing a campaign rally at the Alamo City Music Hall November 04, 2018 in San Antonio, Texas. As Election Day approaches polls have shown the gap narrow between O'Rourke his opponent, incumbent Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX). (Getty Images)
U.S. Senate candidate Rep. Beto O'Rourke (D-TX) pumps his fist for a cheering crowd before departing a campaign rally at the Alamo City Music Hall November 04, 2018 in San Antonio, Texas. As Election Day approaches polls have shown the gap narrow between O'Rourke his opponent, incumbent Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX). (Getty Images)

Morgan then compared his campaign message with Donald Trump's, saying that it was in direct contrast with the president's 2016 winning slogan of "Make America Great Again," and that O'Rourke's message nearly screamed, "WE’RE ALL GONNA DIE!" telling "320 million Americans they’re all doomed."

Morgan also criticized the Texan politician of basing his campaign message on the climate change crisis, set to unleash "massive migration of tens or hundreds of millions of people from countries that are literally uninhabitable or under water," and said that despite it being O'Rourke's campaign message, he has not promised "to stop it."

"There’s also the small matter of Mr O’Rourke’s staggering hypocrisy on the very issue of climate change. For his Texas election campaign, he signed up to a No Fossil Fuel Money Pledge that declared he wouldn’t line his pockets with big cash donations from the oil, gas and coal barons. Then it later emerged he’d accepted $476,325 in such donations. Indeed, O’Rourke took so much that his name was humiliatingly removed from the No Fossil Fuel Money Pledge," the British journalist said.

Piers Morgan, speaks during a taping of CNN's Piers Morgan Tonight at the annual Clinton Global Initiative (CGI) meeting on September 25, 2013 in New York City. Timed to coincide with the United Nations General Assembly, CGI brings together heads of state, CEOs, philanthropists and others to help find solutions to the world's major problems. (Getty Images)
Piers Morgan, speaks during a taping of CNN's Piers Morgan Tonight at the annual Clinton Global Initiative (CGI) meeting on September 25, 2013 in New York City. Timed to coincide with the United Nations General Assembly, CGI brings together heads of state, CEOs, philanthropists and others to help find solutions to the world's major problems. (Getty Images)

"So he not only broke a major campaign promise, but he also exposed himself as someone who preaches about saving the planet but greases his political palms with money from stuff that destroys the planet," he added in the article.

Morgan also highlighted O'Rourke's stance on the border wall, saying that the existing fencing should be removed "because the dangers from refugees, asylum seekers and illegal immigrants were being massively exaggerated."

The columnist, however, pointed that O'Rourke's campaign message "warned of millions of people fleeing to countries like America from places ravaged by climate change."

"You don’t have to be a Trump ‘Wall’ fan to realise there is a slight contradiction here: if America’s border is about to face such apocalyptic pressure, why on earth would you propose removing all security along it?" Morgan wrote.

Morgan also called O'Rourke "the white version of Barack Obama," however, he added that being like Obama was "not necessarily a winning proposition."

Rep. Beto O'Rourke (D-TX) arrives for a tour with other politicans of the tent encampment recently built near the Tornillo-Guadalupe Port of Entry on June 23, 2018 in Tornillo, Texas. (Getty Images)
Rep. Beto O'Rourke (D-TX) arrives for a tour with other politicans of the tent encampment recently built near the Tornillo-Guadalupe Port of Entry on June 23, 2018 in Tornillo, Texas. (Getty Images)

"He's eloquent, intelligent, well-read, tall (6ft 4), handsome, exudes youthful energy, isn’t afraid to show his emotions, has a beaming smile, and used to be a bit of a naughty boy (he was in a punk band and has a DWI arrest on his record). Beto, also like Obama, says all the right ‘woke’ things on social media that make him a Twitter hero – whether it’s calling for cannabis to be legalised or defending Colin Kaepernick over his NFL kneeling protest. But ‘being like Obama’ is not necessarily a winning proposition."

Morgan called O'Rourke a "fraud," suggesting that although he portrays himself as the "Man of the People," he is actually "stinking rich."

"There’s also a large whiff of ‘fraud’ about this new ‘Man of the People’. He calls himself Beto, to appeal to the Hispanic community, but his actual name is Robert. He sells himself as just a regular guy, yet he’s actually stinking rich – thanks mainly to his wife who is the daughter of a real estate tycoon worth $500 million."

"Of course, having flair, charisma and good looks are not bad things for a presidential candidate. But they have to be backed up by substance, and that is where O’Rourke looks most dubious," Morgan added.