Man charged with murdering wife in their mansion may have killed her in argument over money, suspect police

The man, identified as 50-year-old David Tronnes, was reportedly indicted on a first-degree murder charge after he called the police to his Orlando home in April this year


                            Man charged with murdering wife in their mansion may have killed her in argument over money, suspect police

Police officials in Florida are investigating whether a husband, charged with murdering his wife, may have killed her over financial troubles after he deceived her by exaggerating how wealthy he was.

The man, identified as 50-year-old David Tronnes, was reportedly indicted on a first-degree murder charge after he called the police to his Orlando home in April this year, claiming he had found his wife dead in a half-full bathtub. Reports state that his wife, Shanti Cooper-Tronnes, had been married to the accused for only a year. Tronnes, who was charged on August 29, is currently being held without bond at the Orange County Jail.

According to Tronnes' friends, he had presented himself as a millionaire and it was his alleged wealth which enticed the victim to marry him, according to Orlando Sentinel.

Now, police officials are probing his lack of money as a possible motive for the murder, according to reports. Tronnes had claimed that his wife slipped and died in the bathtub, however, police has disputed his claims. Officials found the body of the victim and the bathtub both dry, contrary to Tronnes' claims.



 

Detective Teresa Sprague, in an audio obtained by the Sentinel, can be heard telling the accused: "Common sense would tell you if you pull a woman — soaking wet — out of a tub at 3 o'clock and call the police within six minutes, that everything will be soaking wet when police arrive within three minutes of that. That's common sense."

A friend of the victim, Melissa Burzinski, while talking to investigators, said: "Dave was doing things that was [ticking] her off as it pertains to money." She also claimed that the accused would also get "weird" when it came to paying for food, the Sentinel reported.

"He always talked about how he had a ton of money, but she couldn't figure out why he was such a miser," the friend added.

Cooper-Tronnes, who owned a successful consulting business, was perceived to be the couple's primary provider



 

When officials interviewed the neighbors, it was revealed that they weren't certain about Tronnes profession, while some said that he worked in sales, others said that his wife was the main earner in their family. Some neighbors also stated that they usually spotted Tronnes at home, overseeing a renovation project which was going on at his house.

Meanwhile, the victim's father, Kishian Matani, told the detectives that he thought Tronnes had inherited around $4 million and $6 million from his father. "Shanti told me that he inherited quite a bit," Matani said. 

Cooper-Tronnes' father-in-law, Norman Daugh, however, said that it always appeared to him that Shanti was the one paying for things like TVs and moving vans. "It just was my gut feeling. He always claimed he had millions, but Shanti bought everything," he said.

In an update, records showed Cooper-Tronnes died from blunt head trauma and strangulation.