Traditionalists slam over-sexualized Oktoberfest "porno dresses" as tourists let it all hang out

According to reports, in 2017, an estimated 6.2 million people attended Oktoberfest, and about 7.5 million one-liter glasses of beer were drunk


                            Traditionalists slam over-sexualized Oktoberfest "porno dresses" as tourists let it all hang out

The world's biggest beer festival kicked off over the weekend, and Oktoberfest is where you can see huge tankards of beer and smiling superstrong barmaids, and thousands of visitors who dress up in traditional dirndl Bavarian clothing. This year, however, according to the Daily Star, women in Bavarian fancy-dress have been photographed necking steins of beer and pouring them over themselves while sporting the racy traditional outfits, and this has not gone down well with Oktoberfest traditionalists.

A female reveler from the USA downs her beer in the Armbrustschuetzenzelt tent on the second day of the 2018 Oktoberfest beer festival on September 23, 2018 in Munich, Germany. This year's Oktoberfest runs through October 7 and is the world's largest beer festival. Oktoberfest typically draws over six million visitors. (Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images)
A female reveler from the USA downs her beer in the Armbrustschuetzenzelt tent on the second day of the 2018 Oktoberfest beer festival on September 23, 2018 in Munich, Germany. This year's Oktoberfest runs through October 7 and is the world's largest beer festival. Oktoberfest typically draws over six million visitors. (Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images)

People who attended the stein pouring were heavily slammed for over-sexualizing the annual German event and using it as a chance to wear “porno dresses”. One of the people slamming the entire thing is Munich resident Franz Thalhammer, who has questioned why so many visitors feel the need to poorly imitate the traditional dirndl Bavarian clothing, according to the Star.

He told the paper, "With the young women it often looks like porno dresses, short and low-cut and cheap material. It has nothing to do with identity." The Bavarian outfits, which often turn out to be quite revealing in nature, are synonymous with at the world's most popular beer festival and their popularity has only surged in the past decade, reports the publication.

Visitors drink beer during the 185th Oktoberfest, Munich's annual beer festival, on September 22, 2018 in Munich, southern Germany. - The world's largest beer festival is held from September 22 until October 7, 2018. (CHRISTOF STACHE/AFP/Getty Images)
Visitors drink beer during the 185th Oktoberfest, Munich's annual beer festival, on September 22, 2018 in Munich, southern Germany. - The world's largest beer festival is held from September 22 until October 7, 2018. (CHRISTOF STACHE/AFP/Getty Images)

Thalhammer said: “A dirndl is something nice, it can make almost anyone pretty. But some of the dresses you see these days are crazy. You go in a tent and it's full of paralytic Australians and Italians and they've forked out £224 for a complete Bavarian outfit and think they're Bavarians."

“It's as if I'd walk around half-naked and say I'm Australian.”

People celebrate with beers after the official opening of the 185th Oktoberfest, Munich's annual beer festival, on September 22, 2018 in Munich, southern Germany. - The world's largest beer festival is held from September 22 until October 7, 2018. (CHRISTOF STACHE/AFP/Getty Images)
People celebrate with beers after the official opening of the 185th Oktoberfest, Munich's annual beer festival, on September 22, 2018 in Munich, southern Germany. - The world's largest beer festival is held from September 22 until October 7, 2018. (CHRISTOF STACHE/AFP/Getty Images)

According to reports, in 2017, an estimated 6.2 million people attended Oktoberfest, and about 7.5 million one-liter glasses of beer were drunk. This year, the fest started on September 22 and runs through to October 7.

Reports also suggest that Britons are among the top 10 visitors to the annual festival, which has been running since the 1800s. The famous booze fest is also being hosted in a number of UK cities in recent years and has given revelers the opportunity to enjoy the traditional Munich fair while staying much closer to home.