Barack Obama suggests that Donald Trump's "anger, racism, mommy issues" is preventing him from fixing America's problem

The former president addressed climate change, agriculture and education, saying fixing problems associated with these issues are not as complicated as they are made out to be.


                            Barack Obama suggests that Donald Trump's "anger, racism, mommy issues" is preventing him from fixing America's problem

Former President Barack Obama on Monday suggested that President Donald Trump may have "mommy issues" which are hindering him from fixing the country's problems, reports state. Obama, while talking at the Obama Foundation summit in Chicago, said that according to him, the world "badly needs remaking."

The former president addressed pertinent issues like climate change, agriculture and education and said that fixing problems associated with these issues are nearly not as complicated as they are made out to be in today's times.

Although the Democrat did not mention Trump's name, he appeared to call him out by saying "the reason we don't do it is because we are still confused, blind, shrouded with hate, anger, racism, mommy issues," the Daily Mail reported.

Former U.S. President Barack Obama speaks during a Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee rally at the Anaheim Convention Center on September 8, 2018 in Anaheim, California. This is Obama's first campaign rally for the 2018 midterm elections.
Former U.S. President Barack Obama speaks during a Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee rally at the Anaheim Convention Center on September 8, 2018 in Anaheim, California. This is Obama's first campaign rally for the 2018 midterm elections.

Trump, on many occasions, has credited his success — "for much of what I've done and so much of what I've become" —  to his mother Mary MacLeod Trump, who died in 2000. However, reports state that the Republican's mother appeared to have been embarrassed by Trump's antics throughout the 1990s. She had once famously asked of Trump's first wife Ivana: "What sort of son have I created?"

Obama, ever since he left office, has made a conscious effort of avoiding direct criticism of his successor. However, we witnessed the former president changing his stance right before the midterm elections when he questioned the Republican party for failing to keep a check on Trump.

"What happened to the Republican Party?" Obama asked during a speech he made in September this year, accusing Trump of "capitalizing" on "fear and anger" of the voters.

The Democrat had also called the president out by his name, saying that Trump was a "symptom, not the cause" of broader ailments in the nation's politics. Obama, in another dig at Trump on Monday, also suggested that the United States was a better place before he was sworn into office.

U.S. President Donald Trump talks to reporters while hosting workers and members of his cabinet for a meeting in the Oval Office at the White House October 17, 2018 in Washington, DC. The White House said the meeting was on “Cutting the Red Tape, Unleashing Economic Freedom.'
U.S. President Donald Trump talks to reporters while hosting workers and members of his cabinet for a meeting in the Oval Office at the White House October 17, 2018 in Washington, DC. The White House said the meeting was on “Cutting the Red Tape, Unleashing Economic Freedom.'

Despite his criticism, Obama, while talking to author Dave Eggers, reinstated his long-held belief that if one could choose a time and place to be born, they would choose America. However, he made a slight alteration to his statement, saying: "You'd choose now – or maybe two years ago."

"What prevents us from implementing most of the things that we would probably collectively agree would make the world better is not the absence of technological solutions, it's because there are humans involved and that the dynamics of the society," Obama said. "Do we care about these kids? Because maybe we don't…They look a little different to us."

The former president, during the conference, also urged social innovators and community organizers to be patient while they pursued wide-scale changes: "You can remake the world right now, because it badly needs remaking," he said adding that patience was, however, key to change because societies are "complex, organic things that you don't turn (like) switches. They evolve. They shift. They change."