Nike customers BURN clothes to protest Colin Kaepernick becoming the face of brand's campaign

Nike released a statement, stating that it decided to use Kaepernick as part of its ad campaign because it believes he is one of the most inspirational athletes of this generation.


                            Nike customers BURN clothes to protest Colin Kaepernick becoming the face of brand's campaign

Shortly after Nike announced the football quarterback Colin Kaepernick as the face of its new Just Do It campaign, several customers began protesting by destroying apparel and footwear of the brand.

Nike released a statement, stating that it decided to use Kaepernick as part of its ad campaign because it believes he is one of the most inspirational athletes of this generation. Kaepernick was the first National Football League (NFL) player to take a knee during the national anthem as a protest against racism and police brutality.

Nike vice president of the brand for North America, said: "We believe Colin is one of the most inspirational athletes of this generation, who has leveraged the power of sport to help move the world forward," according to ESPN.

 

Kaepernick shared the picture on his Instagram, stirring a controversy
Kaepernick shared the picture on his Instagram, stirring a controversy

 

The brand's decision, however, upset several customers who are against the NFL players kneeling during the anthem. People took to Twitter and shared images and videos of themselves burning and cutting the goods. Multiple clips showed people setting their clothes and shoes on fire.

John Rich, a member of the Big & Rich, said that their soundman, who is a former marine, had to cut off the famous Nike logo from his socks after the announcement.

 



 

Veterans organization Vote Vets, however, asked upset customers to donate their items instead of burning them. 

A Twitter user, Sean Clancy, posted a video of himself burning a pair of Nike sneakers on the micro-blogging site and wrote: "First the NFL forces me to choose between my favorite sport and my country. I chose country. Then Nike forces me to choose between my favorite shoes and my country. Since when did the American Flag and the National Anthem become offensive?"

 



 



 

Nike spokesperson, Sandra Carreon-John, on Monday said: "Colin has been a Nike athlete since 2011. Colin is one of a number of athletes being featured as part of our 30th anniversary of Just Do It."

Carreon-John added that Nike unveiled its new campaign last week by releasing a film, which featured Serena Williams with the title "Voice of Belief."

Kaepernick began his protest two years ago when he was with the San Francisco 49ers at the time and stirred a national controversy. He had done so in an effort to protest rampant police brutality in the country. Other players took his cue and joined the protest in the 2016 season, and other players have continued the protest till now.

Kaepernick's movement drew heavy criticism from President Donald Trump, who even called for the owners of the NFL teams to fire the players who were participating in it.

The NFL, earlier this year, had announced a rule which required all the players to stand during the national anthem. The association, however, gave an option to the players to stand off the field until the ceremony was over instead of kneeling outside.