International Women's Day 2018: Badass female characters who inspired us to be feminists

International Women's Day 2018: Badass female characters who inspired us to be feminists

We may not have had as many female role models growing up as children have currently, but the ones we did have were pretty badass.

From Marvel's Jessica James to Maggie of 'The Walking Dead,' children today are spoiled for choice when it comes sheroes to look up to on their screens.

While there can never be too much inclusivity and we still have a long way to go for the playing field to be levelled for both genders, we have come a long way from how things were even ten to twenty years back.  

This is not to say, we did not have our female role models – as few and as far between as they were.

On 2018 International Women's Day, let us celebrate the on-screen characters who inspired us to be individualistic, proud and feminist.  

Topanga (Boy Meets World)

  


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Topanga, played by Danielle Fishel, was the romantic interest of the titular boy aka Corey Mathews. However, she was so much more than just someone to be pursued or be impressed by Corey. She was portrayed as a smart, intelligent, individualistic, perfectly weird beautiful young girl who grew up to a strong powerful woman, as seen on the reboot show 'Girl Meets World'.   


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Despite prioritizing love over certain personal goals, she always knew what, when and how she wanted everything in her life. In being the girl next door, yet smashing ever stereotype associated with that role, she was among the first role models for 90s kids.  

Buffy Summers (Buff the Vampire Slayer) 


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For most women who grew up in the 90s, 'Buffy the Vampire Slayer' still has a special place in their heart. The iconic protagonist of the show was unapologetically a badass action hero who was well aware of her skill sets. There was no running to the symbolic man for help or second-guessing her own capabilities.   



It has been 20 years since Buffy first graced our TV screens, and the show continues to be among the first few shows that gave young lesbians positive role models.  

Eliza Thornberry (The Wild Thornberrys) 


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This 12-year-old strong and independent young girl with the ability to talk to animals is also one of the most unique and individualistic characters to ever appear on our TV screens. She proved that any woman can have an interest in and excel in the STEM fields.  

Eliza Thornton (Twitter)
Eliza Thornton (Twitter)

At a time when girls were told to focus on keeping themselves pretty, Eliza was seen trying to save the environment on multiple occasions, often times getting dirty in the process. But, society's ideas for how a girl should dress or look never bothered her. She was among the best role models for young girls in the 90s.  

Clarissa Darling (Clarissa Explains It All) 


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Not only was the Melissa Joan Hart starrer the first Disney show with a female protagonist, she was also among the smartest characters to ever be featured on the network. The tech-savvy teenager created her own computer games and spent her time on a hoard of things other than focusing on boys. 


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Clarissa is also among the first characters on TV to not give a damn about gender stereotypes. From owning a pet alligator to confidently discussing her bodily functions, she approached life on her own terms paying no heed to the gender binary.

Judge Judy (Judge Judy) 


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The retired Manhattan family court judge Judy presided over one after real small-claims case after another inside a televised courtroom for over a decade. She was clear about taking no bulls**t from anybody and refused to left anybody disrespect her.


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While the reality star herself has abstained from calling herself a feminist, she is a "common sense girl" who inspired many to be one. Her confidence and self of individuality has allowed many young girls to embrace their own uniqueness and take pride in it as well.

Special mention: The Powerpuff Girls

'The Powerpuff Girls' were symbols of girl power in the 90s and early 2000s, representing all aspects of femininity. The three tiny superheroes had very distinctive personalities and were ever ready to fight the bad guys and save the day. The witty, smart trio inspired and entertained children everywhere in equal measures.

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