Healthy grandmother dies after doctors remove both kidneys after misdiagnosing her with cancer

Seventy three-year-old Linda Woolley, of Englewood, Colorado, was reportedly on the transplant list when she suffered a cardiac arrest on Friday


                            Healthy grandmother dies after doctors remove both kidneys after misdiagnosing her with cancer

A 73-year-old healthy woman died eight months after doctors at the University of Colorado removed both her kidneys after misdiagnosing her with cancer, according to reports.

The woman, identified as Linda Woolley of Englewood, was reportedly on the transplant list when she suffered a cardiac arrest on Friday, which resulted in her death, Woolley's family said, according to Daily Mail.

Reports state that she was diagnosed with "likely" kidney cancer at the hospital in March 2018 and subsequently underwent surgery to remove both of them in May.



 

But shortly after the surgery, doctors realized that they had committed an error after they conducted a post-operative biopsy and found no evidence of cancer in either of her kidneys. Reports state that after the removal of her kidneys, the 73-year-old had to undergo four hours of dialysis for three days per week.

Woolley had then said that the entire procedure had turned her life upside down, according to reports. Dialysis is an arduous process which requires patients to be hooked up to an IV which cleans and filters their blood, acting as the kidneys. Woolley, during an interview last year, had said: "I feel like they owe me a kidney, that's for sure." She made the statement after hiring an attorney to sue the hospital, reports state.

The surgeons realized that they had committed an error after they conducted a post-surgery biopsy and found no cancer in her organs. (Getty Images)
The surgeons realized that they had committed an error after they conducted a post-surgery biopsy and found no cancer in her organs. (Getty Images)

She added that she "was not really happy" after discovering what went wrong during the surgery. "My life was totally changed. Dialysis is no picnic no matter how used to it you get, it robs you of your life," she said. 

The outlet reported that after the botched surgery, it was determined that Woolley as not well enough to be immediately put on the transplant waiting list.

Transplant hopefuls are required to be in a healthy state, capable of withstanding a life-threatening surgery and then are needed to be on immunosuppressing drugs for life. The waiting period on a transplant list generally averages between seven and ten years.