Harvey Weinstein reaches tentative $44m compensation deal with sexual assault accusers, film studio: reports

If finalized, the deal will help resolve a civil rights lawsuit filed by the New York attorney general’s office last year that accuses the company's executives and board of failing to protect employees from a hostile work environment and Weinstein’s sexual misconduct.


                            Harvey Weinstein reaches tentative $44m compensation deal with sexual assault accusers, film studio: reports

NEW YORK : A tentative deal has been reached to settle multiple lawsuits brought against the television and film company co-founded by Harvey Weinstein, who has been accused of sexual misconduct by scores of women.

Attorneys involved in the negotiations told a federal bankruptcy court judge during a hearing in Wilmington, Delaware, Thursday that a breakthrough in a still-unfinished mediation had put a settlement within reach. "We now have an economic agreement in principle that is supported by the plaintiffs, the AG's office, the defendants and all of the insurers that, if approved, would provide significant compensation to victims, creditors and the estate, and allow the parties to avoid years of costly, time-consuming and uncertain litigation on all sides," Adam Harris, a lawyer for studio co-founder Bob Weinstein, told a bankruptcy court judge in Wilmington, Delaware, on Thursday.

The amount of the deal wasn't revealed in court, but a person familiar with the negotiations told The Associated Press it was worth $44 million. The person wasn't authorized to reveal details of the discussions and spoke on condition of anonymity.

The deal will help resolve a civil rights lawsuit filed by the New York attorney general’s office last year that accuses the company's executives and board of failing to protect employees from a hostile work environment and Weinstein’s sexual misconduct.(Getty Images)

The size of the settlement was first reported by The Wall Street Journal. Under the proposed settlement, which has not been finalized, $30 million would be paid to the plaintiffs --  which includes former employees of Weinstein Co. -- and $14 million would go to pay legal fees, with the funds coming from insurance policies, The Wall Street Journal reported.

He cautioned that there was still "a lot of work here to do."

"But," he added, "I personally am very optimistic."

Advisers to Weinstein Co. still need to approve the deal. If finalized, the deal will help resolve a civil rights lawsuit filed by the New York attorney general’s office last year that accuses the company's executives and board of failing to protect employees from a hostile work environment and Weinstein’s sexual misconduct.

The New York attorney general's office declined to comment on the amount of the settlement.

More than 15 lawsuits have been filed accusing Harvey Weinstein or the company of misconduct. The settlement would cover many of them, including a class action by alleged victims and a suit by the New York attorney general.

The class-action complaint accuses the company of operating like an organized crime group to conceal widespread sexual harassment and assaults.

Harvey Weinstein exits a court hearing at New York Criminal Court, December 20, 2018 in New York City. Weinstein's legal team is expected to try to convince a judge that the sexual assault charges against Weinstein should be dropped and the case thrown out.(Getty Images)

The scandal forced the studio into bankruptcy.

Weinstein also faces criminal charges in New York of rape and performing a forcible sex act. His trial is scheduled to begin in September.

He denies all allegations of nonconsensual sex.

An attorney who represents unsecured creditors in the bankruptcy of the Weinstein film studio, Robert Feinstein, told U.S. Bankruptcy Court Judge Mary Walrath that mediation talks that had broken down a few months ago had recently been restarted.

A global settlement of the class action lawsuit and all other legal action against the Weinstein Co. seemed to become possible only in the past few days, he said, though he cautioned that many details remained to be resolved.

"I think we are poised to get there. I can't assure the court that we will," he said.

Harris said the settlement was complex due to the number of claims, and insurance companies, involved.

"We're dealing with potential claims here that go back . More than 25 years," he said, adding that the nature of the allegations had also made for "a highly charged environment, with very strong feelings on all sides."