Greta Thunberg says she's taking a break, ‘needs to rest’ at home after busy year of global climate activism

After months of traveling across the globe, she recently reached Turin, Italy from Madrid via train after her travel of the United States.


                            Greta Thunberg says she's taking a break, ‘needs to rest’ at home after busy year of global climate activism
Greta Thunberg sitting on the floor of a train surrounded by bags Saturday, December 14, 2019. (Twitter @GretaThunberg via AP)

Greta Thunberg has been on the road - or rather the sea - for the past couple of months, traveling to spread the word about climate change and urging change. She recently reached Turin, Italy from Madrid via train after her travel of the United States. "I will be home for Christmas and then I will take a holiday break because you need to take rest,” she told reporters in Turin about returning to Sweden. “Otherwise you cannot do this all the time.”

The activist was recently named Time's Person of the Year and was promptly "bullied" by Donald Trump over the achievement as the 73-year-old went on to advise that she "must work on her Anger Management problem, then go to a good old fashioned movie with a friend!”. Thunberg won the internet after she changed her Twitter bio to match the president's tweet.

The 16-year-old activist joined the Fridays for Future protest in Turin and called on for stronger laws in the upcoming year. "2019 is almost over," said Thunberg, "We must make sure that 2020 is the year of action, is the year when we bend the global emissions curve. We are going to put pressure on those in power, we are going to make sure that they will act and they will take responsibility".

"We can no longer take that tomorrow for granted," continued Thunberg. In her last social media update, she posted a photo of herself in a train in Germany, as she made her way to Sweden. "Traveling on overcrowded trains through Germany. And I’m finally on my way home!" said the climate change icon along with a shot of her looking outside the window.

Thunberg's Fridays for the Future was born from her lone protests when she was 15 after she started skipping school every Friday to protest in front of the Swedish Parliament to call on the limiting of carbon emissions to fight climate change. Soon, the teen's voice went viral and the protest took global momentum.

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