Glastonbury Festival to ban plastic bottles in 2019 edition

The festival, which has always leaned towards eco-friendly causes, previously made stainless steel bottles and cups available on-site along with hundreds of free to use filling stations.

Glastonbury Festival to ban plastic bottles in 2019 edition

When one of the most iconic festivals of the world returns in June 2019, visitors won’t be allowed any plastic bottles on site.

The move shouldn’t come as a surprise though, as ‘Glasto' has been encouraging its guests to leave plastic bottles at home for a while now.

In 2014, Glastonbury introduced stainless steel bottles and water stations to encourage cost-free refilling at the hundreds of taps available on location. Stainless steel pint cups were also brought into the fold in 2016, along with a “Love the farm… leave no trace” initiative.

The festival is also careful to allow the farmland recover once every five years. 2018 is one such ‘fallow’ year which is why there will be no edition held this year.

“Our big mission for next year is banning plastic bottles. We’re in the middle of it at the moment,” Festival organizer Emily Eavis told the BBC. “It’s an enormous project; it’s taking a lot of time to tackle with all the different people we work with,” she added.

In 2014, Glastonbury introduced stainless steel bottles and water stations to encourage cost-free refilling at the hundreds of taps available on location. (Image Source: Getty Images)

Vendors at the event are already using re-usable or compostable flatware and plates. The festival’s many green policies can be viewed on its website. They also encourage festivalgoers to take home what they bring, which includes tents, baggage, blankets and other trinkets.

Glastonbury also publishes numbers that exemplify the vast amount of waste that is recycled after each edition. In 2014 — the most current numbers available — 54 percent or 983 tons of the waste generated on site was recycled, which included 114 tons of composted organic waste, 400 tons of chipped wood, 23 tons of glass, 85 tons of cans and plastic bottles, 41 tons of cardboard, 162 tons of scrap metal, 11.2 tons of clothing, tents, sleeping bags, 0.264 tons of batteries, three tons of dense plastic, 0.25 tons plastic sheets.

It cost the festival a staggering $1.1 million to dispose of all the rubbish after the 2014 edition. (Image Source: Getty Images)

It cost the festival a staggering $1.1 million to dispose of all the rubbish.

“That’s £780,000 less to Water Aid, Greenpeace or Oxfam – the main recipients of any profits made by Glastonbury. With £780,000, Water Aid can enable 52,000 people to access to safe water, improve hygiene and sanitation,” the website states.

Organizers point out the contribution of some 1,300 volunteers that work for a ticket or their respective charities. Unfortunately, Apart from the fact that it will be plastic-bottle free, not many details are available regarding the next Glastonbury in 2019. So far, it’s just been run-of-the-mill rumors.

Recently, festival father Michael Eavis revealed to Radio 1 that “two or three” of headlining acts currently being lined up for 2019 have never played the festival before.

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