Brett Kavanaugh: FBI probe does not corroborate Ford's sexual assault allegations, White House sources say

As the White House went ahead with Kavanaugh's nomination on Thursday, it was still not clear whether the president spoke to him over the phone ever since he was briefed on the FBI report


                            Brett Kavanaugh: FBI probe does not corroborate Ford's sexual assault allegations, White House sources say

President Donald Trump has reportedly been briefed on the FBI investigation probe into sexual assault allegations laid against his Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh by aides, according to reports. As the White House went ahead with Kavanaugh's nomination on Thursday, it was still not clear whether the president spoke to him over the phone ever since he was briefed on the FBI report, according to the Daily Mail.

White House Deputy Press Secretary, Raj Shah, said that White House officials, who had read the supplemental background check report provided by the FBI, were confident that Kavanaugh's nomination would be confirmed when the Senate takes a vote this Saturday, reports state.

U.S. President Donald Trump introduces U.S. Circuit Judge Brett M. Kavanaugh as his nominee to the United States Supreme Court during an event in the East Room of the White House July 9, 2018 in Washington, DC. Pending confirmation by the U.S. Senate, Judge Kavanaugh would succeed Associate Justice Anthony Kennedy, 81, who is retiring after 30 years of service on the high court.
U.S. President Donald Trump introduces U.S. Circuit Judge Brett M. Kavanaugh as his nominee to the United States Supreme Court during an event in the East Room of the White House July 9, 2018 in Washington, DC. Pending confirmation by the U.S. Senate, Judge Kavanaugh would succeed Associate Justice Anthony Kennedy, 81, who is retiring after 30 years of service on the high court.

A single copy of the FBI report was sent to all the senators on Thursday morning for them to read in a secure room in the US Capitol's basement, according to reports. The FBI reportedly finished its investigations late Wednesday, two days ahead of the schedule and distributed the report to all the senators early on Thursday morning.

The White House spokesperson, in a statement, said: "This is the last addition to the most comprehensive review of a Supreme Court nominee in history, which includes extensive hearings, multiple committee interviews, over 1,200 questions for the record and over a half million pages of documents."

"With this additional information, the White House is fully confident the Senate will vote to confirm Judge Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court," the statement added.

 

Donald Trump's Suprme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh
Donald Trump's Suprme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh

 

The FBI report has come days after the Senate voting for Kavanaugh's nomination, and the extraordinary and historic hearing of clinical psychology professor Dr. Christine Blasey Ford, who publicly detailed her sexual assault allegations against Kavanaugh in front of the Senate Judiciary Committee last week.

Ford's testimony, which was painful to watch for many, was widely seen as credible as she asked for an FBI investigation into her claims and stood in stark contrast to Kavanaugh's, who not even once conceded to an FBI investigation, repeatedly suggesting that the Senate hearing was enough. The judge has also been accused of sexual misconduct by two other women — Deborah Ramirez and Julie Swetnick. Kavanaugh, however, has denied all the allegations.

The Senate Judiciary Committee subsequently agreed on an FBI investigation into the allegations after Republican Senator Jeff Flake said that he would withdraw his vote if the investigation is not conducted. 

 

Christine Blasey Ford, testifies before the US Senate Judiciary Committee in the Dirksen Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill September 27, 2018 in Washington, DC. A professor at Palo Alto University and a research psychologist at the Stanford University School of Medicine, Ford has accused Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh of sexually assaulting her during a party in 1982 when they were high school students in suburban Maryland.
Christine Blasey Ford, testifies before the US Senate Judiciary Committee in the Dirksen Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill September 27, 2018 in Washington, DC. A professor at Palo Alto University and a research psychologist at the Stanford University School of Medicine, Ford has accused Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh of sexually assaulting her during a party in 1982 when they were high school students in suburban Maryland.

 

Now the Senate voting on Saturday, particularly the votes of five senators riding the fence, will determine whether Kavanaugh gets to sit on the bench or not. If the judge is confirmed, it will cement conservative control of the judicial system, giving the Republican party an advantage on all the legal disputes.

Democrats have, however, raised concerns that the investigation was not thoroughly carried out as the White House limited its scope. There are also concerns that the FBI did not interview Ford who is the prime accuser in the allegations against Kavanaugh.