Chick-fil-A ends donations to Christian charities after major backlash from LGBT rights activists: 'It's the right thing to do'

According to the fast-food giant, it will no longer donate to the Salvation Army, the Paul Anderson Youth Home, and the Fellowship of Christian Athletes — known to oppose same-sex marriage — as it expands


                            Chick-fil-A ends donations to Christian charities after major backlash from LGBT rights activists: 'It's the right thing to do'

After being on the receiving end of a major backlash from LGBT rights activists for the last several weeks, Chick-fil-A announced on Monday, November 18, that it has stopped donations to several Christian organizations it was previously associated with.

According to the fast-food giant, it will no longer donate to the Salvation Army, the Paul Anderson Youth Home, and the Fellowship of Christian Athletes — known to oppose same-sex marriage — as it expands.

Previously, the company's charity arm, the Chick-fil-A Foundation, had donated millions of organizations to conservative causes, according to the National Review report.

"We made multi-year commitments to both organizations and we fulfilled those obligations in 2018," a rep for the chain said, adding they will now focus on charitable donations towards "education, homelessness, and hunger".

Same-sex couple Tyler Savage and Larry Farris kiss outside a Chick-fil-A restaurant on August 3, 2012, in Dallas, Texas (Getty Images)

Now, the franchise plans to donate more than $9 million to charity, with  $25,000 going towards a local food bank for every new outlet they open.

"There's no question. We know that as we go into new markets, we need to be clear about who we are," Chick-fil-A President and Chief Operating Officer Tim Tassopoulos told Bisnow. "There are lots of articles and newscasts about Chick-fil-A, and we thought we needed to be clear about our message."

Chick-fil-A has been criticized by LGBT rights groups for the longest time. Following a $2 million donation to Christian charities earlier this year, the San Antonio City Council took drastic steps to ban the franchise from San Antonio's airport in March.

"When there is tension, we want to make sure we're being clear. We think this is going to be helpful," Tassopoulos said of the company’s controversial decision. "It's just the right thing to do: to be clear, caring, and supportive and do it in the community."

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