Woman offers $19,000 to designers willing to make a 'bespoke ball gown' out of dead mother's hair

The woman, who chose to remain anonymous, said she had been collecting the hair for four years and that she wanted to commemorate the one year anniversary of her mother's passing


                            Woman offers $19,000 to designers willing to make a 'bespoke ball gown' out of dead mother's hair

Sewport, a clothing designer in London, often gets unique and odd requests of clothing designs from patrons, but it looks like one anonymous woman's eclectic taste has trumped them all. Identified as only a 61-year-old woman hailing from Bristol, she wrote about how she was looking for a dressmaker who is able to create a "bespoke ball gown" with design features using her dead mother's hair.

She revealed how she had collected the hair over a period of four years and that she was going as far as to offer any skilled designer willing to take up what she herself described as an "admittedly quite weird request" £15,000 ($19,300) to manufacture the gown. Stumped by the post, Sewport posted a screenshot of her project description so those interested could take it up.

The design submitted by the anonymous user for the dress (Sewport)
The design submitted by the anonymous user for the dress (Sewport)

The woman had explained how her mother had passed away recently and that she wanted to create a special memento of her life. "The dress will serve as this," she wrote. "However, I need a specialist as the material I'd like to create it from is admittedly quite weird."

"I found out my mother was ill in 2014 and, from that point onward, I began to collect her hair," she revealed. "At the time, I wasn't sure why I was collecting it, however, now I think I do. I'd like the dress to be made with my mother's hair intertwined into the dress' design. I want the dress to be authentic to the time, with the sleeves, button, trim, and neckline collar completely made from my mother's hair."

"I'd also like the bodice around the midsection of the dress to have a lacy, floral design made with the hair," she continued. "I've been collecting her hair for over four years and have one large box of it, which I think should be enough."

The woman had also included a sketch of what she would like the ball gown dress to look like, writing how she was aware that it may cost "quite a bit" and promising £15,000 to anyone willing to take up the task. She also asked for the dress to ideally be ready for August next year, which she says will be the anniversary of her mother's passing.

Social designer Alex Bizet, who has previously made a clothing collection from hair, told the Independent that designing clothes using hair came with its fair share of challenges. "It is hard to use human hair as a fiber to create garments, as hair is not adapted to the textile technique we have today. It required a lot of research (and still does) to reach the quality to make wearable material. Hair is full of keratin and does not have the natural bond that wool has, like microscopic hooks that help the material to be stable and strong like in a classical felt."

Speaking to the BBC, Boris Hodakel, the founder of the Sewport, said that most design requests were "typically snapped up by manufacturers within six hours." He added, "We deal with quirky and wonderful designs every day — that's fashion."