Woman goes to bed with fever, wakes up from coma in hospital 10 days later to find fingers and legs amputated

A blood test confirmed that she had meningococcal B. Chinnasri was quickly placed in a coma as hospital staff worked tirelessly to try and save her life


                            Woman goes to bed with fever, wakes up from coma in hospital 10 days later to find fingers and legs amputated

A young woman in Australia, who lost both her legs and all her fingers to a deadly disease called Meningococcal Meningitis, initially thought that she was just catching a common cold. The 28-year-old Juttima Chinnasri from Sydney said that she went to bed in October last year early because she had been worried that the fever she had was a sign that she could come down with the flu. When the young woman woke up the following morning, however, she found that her body was covered in unusual dark rashes and was immediately rushed to the hospital.

The medical staff at St. George Hospital told Chinnasri that she had been "very, very sick" the previous night. A blood test confirmed that she had Meningococcal B. Chinnasri was quickly placed in a coma as the staff at the hospital worked tirelessly to try and save her life.



 

Chinnasri later found out that her fingers and legs were amputated when she woke up from the coma 10 days later. She told the Daily Telegraph: "Half of me didn't believe it. I hoped there was another way out so I did not have to lose my legs and hands." The young woman spent the next three months in the hospital learning how to live her life without her extremities.

She has since gone back to her parents' home in Kogarah, South Sydney, after she became wheelchair-bound. In spite of her not being able to use her legs to walk anymore, she says that she has been very lucky. Chinnasri said: "I just try and think I am lucky I'm still here, it could have been way worse."



 

One in every 10 people who contract Meningococcal B are believed to die shortly after the diagnosis. Meningococcal Australia's Eliza Ault-Connell told Daily Mail that the timing of the treatment plays a key role in surviving the fatal disease. She said: "We've seen people at breakfast be dead by dinner, you literally see rashes develop before their eyes."

Meningococcal disease is said to be a bacterial infection that can cause the death of the patient within only a few hours if it is not recognized or treated in time. There are five strains of the disease now and Australia has a vaccine for each of them.

Even though the majority of those afflicted with the disease will recover completely, 10% of those who are infected will die and about 20% of them will have permanent disabilities.



 

If the disease is left untreated and unnoticed, it can be fatal. Amputation is quite common in cases of meningococcal disease as well as organ failure and damage to the kidney, with some of the extreme cases requiring long-term dialysis.

A majority of cases with the disease is seen in babies and children up to the age of five who account for two-thirds of all the reported cases because their immune systems are not as matured.